Humanity, Philosophy, Politics, Religion, Symbolism, Writings

Sacrifice


“No offence to my readers in US or else where in the world”

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The drama unfolded shortly after Mr. Bush appeared at a news conference in Baghdad with Prime Minister Nuri Kamal Al-Maliki to highlight the newly adopted security agreement between the United States and Iraq. The agreement includes a commitment to withdraw all American forces by the end of 2011.

The Iraqi journalist, Muntader al-Zaidi, 28, a correspondent for Al Baghdadia, an independent Iraqi television station, stood up about 12 feet from Mr. Bush and shouted in Arabic: “This is a gift from the Iraqis; this is the farewell kiss, you dog!” He then threw a shoe at Mr. Bush, who ducked and narrowly avoided it.

As stunned security agents and guards, officials and journalists watched, Mr. Zaidi then threw his other shoe, shouting in Arabic, “This is from the widows, the orphans and those who were killed in Iraq!” That shoe also narrowly missed Mr. Bush as Prime Minister Maliki stuck a hand in front of the president’s face to help shield him.

Mr. Maliki’s security agents jumped on the man, wrestled him to the floor and hustled him out of the room. They kicked him and beat him until “he was crying like a woman,” said Mohammed Taher, a reporter for Afaq, a television station owned by the Dawa Party, which is led by Mr. Maliki. Mr. Zaidi was then detained on unspecified charges.

When I read this story first time, it flashed before my eyes, as a usual news item. My curiosity to make analogies made me wondered to observe the striking resemblance of the incident with the ritual of ‘Rami Jamarat’ during Hajj (Muslims’ Pilgrimage).

Watch this video to understand the write up below:

Jamarat is a Hajj ritual that involves stoning the three pillars that represent the devil (shaytan in Arabic). As part of this Hajj ritual, the pilgrims throw small pebbles at those three structures in the city of Mina. Pilgrims collect these pebbles at Muzadlifa. These pebbles can also be collected in the city of Mina, East of Makkah.

The historical significance of Jamarat ritual hails from Prophet Ibraheem when the devil appeared to him three times. At each of the appearances, Angel Jibraeel (Gabriel) told Prophet Ibraheem (Abraham) to pelt the devil. Thus, the basis of the significance of the ritual.

All three Jamarat pillars represent the shaytan and represent the three times that Prophet Ibraheem was seduced by the devil when he was going to sacrifice Ismail. At each of the three times, the Angel asked him to rid of the temptation by throwing pebbles at the devil.

Once the pilgrims are done with stoning the devil, they return to their camps and slay animals as sacrifice, on face it appears as a ritual to complete the pilgrimage, but in essence this ritual has an ethical connotation, as depicted above. “Mr. Maliki’s security agents jumped on the man, wrestled him to the floor and hustled him out of the room. They kicked him and beat him until “he was crying like a woman,” said Mohammed Taher, a reporter for Afaq, a television station owned by the Dawa Party, which is led by Mr. Maliki. Mr. Zaidi was then detained on unspecified charges.”

Whenever you will rise against the oppressor in favor of the oppressed, you will have to give sacrifice in terms of bodily harm or even at times in the form of your life, as was done by Hazrat Imam Hussain (AS) (progeny of Prophet Muhammad PBUH) on 10th Moharram 61 Hijri (Muslim calendar).

So, whenever you will rise for the cause of humanity, you must get ready to face the wrath of the so called ruling elite, who on the face, portray themselves as the champions of democracy and humanity (equally valid across all the nations of the world).

Sajjad Hussain

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