Arts, Eduaction, Leadership, Management, Motivation, Self development, Symbolism, Vision, Wisdom

Pyramid of Knowledge


While studying management, I use to wonder, why the management model is always a pyramid, on top of which there is always a one man (CEO) of the company. Another thing used to boggle my mind was that if it would have been a rectangle or square, what would have gone wrong and then came the idea of coming up with this blog.

During school days a kid is taught a number of subjects, like language, science, arts, literature, music, history, civics, religion, maths, and quite a few others depending on the country where he is being taught. At times the books he is to carry along out weigh his own weight. I use to think how a kid could learn these many subjects, when we grown up adults do not comprehend quite a few simple subjects.

As he keeps progressing towards his higher education, the number of subjects being taught, starts reducing, and when he goes for the highest degree (i.e. PhD), he is only required to study one subject and that also, not the whole of it, but a part of it, at a micro level.

Picture4

Is it not unfair with the kids. Would it not have been better if he would have been taught one subject in his first year of education, two subjects in 2nd and so on, as shown in the diagram.

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But then after having a deep thinking, I came up with the answer, that the learning capability of a kid is far more than an adult and as he grows in age the learning curve starts decreasing and thereafter, he is only able to make analogies based on his learning and experience over the years to draw conclusions. If we deviate from the usual method of learning as is being practiced across the globe, we will have a whole generations of individuals having a myopic view of the world.

The pyramid thus formed will be unstable as shown here under in comparison with the usual method of education.

The capability of a kid at the initial learning stage, although is greater than a full grown adult, but his ability to make connections of various subjects to draw conclusions to solve problems is limited.

The kid in his early stages of life is only taught to play with data and gradually bombarded with information. Making use of the mind when he is able to process the information is able to convert it into knowledge through the ability to make analogies and draw conclusions. This ability comes at a very later stage in life through education and experience. The pyramid thus formed is highly stable as the base is wide and strong.

When one reaches on top through knowledge, he gets the capability to see, what others can’t see and that is called VISION and the person having that vision becomes a VISIONARY.

Sajjad Hussain

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3 thoughts on “Pyramid of Knowledge”

  1. I recall you sharing this concept on Friday; the epoch stage, where one can see what others cannot. The idea is familiar to me, personally because of having read books of non-fiction history. Even though I agree with such an epoch, I must highlight that your portrait of the education system ends up contradicting your own initial assumption about it as you have evidently written, in a way to appreciate it without having signified its flaws.

    I can emphasize the accountability of the idea that one must plough through any system before one can appreciate or dismantle it for any reason. Likewise, the limitations of the education system must be at least in my view be mentioned towards the end of the article, either as a reference for continued discussion in a sequel article or perhaps be expanded in the same article to a specified extent.

    The impression that this article leaves is that in order to appreciate and marvel the value the education system’s pyramid empowers a person, one must have essentially transcended from the stages of ignorance to embrace the knowledge that it imparts.
    This impression while in itself is sound, the facts that itself ignores leaves a feeling of disgruntled vindication for realists; relishable for idealists.

    Like

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